Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games Anniversary Invitational Sailing Regatta

I was in Stockholm today for a friendly regatta hosted by the 6M Class, part of the city’s week of celebrations commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 1912 Olympics. The International Olympic Committee Chairman, Jacques Rogge and the King of Sweden headlined the regatta here in the city centr.

A number of Olympic sailors took part including Torben Grael who happens to be the sailor who has won the most Olympic medals ever.

The competition was held in ten 6M boats. The crews were comprised of the boats’ owners, plus some famous Olympians from other sports and celebrity sailors.

Two races were held and the Artemis Racing team onboard Rebecca, belonging to Johan Larson, was the winner of the day with a 2, 1.

The sun was out and the temperature in the mid 20s C. When the weather is like this here, the Swedes come out in force. Sun worshiping is the main activity all over the city…the parks, along the bay, absolutely everywhere and everyone.

Tonight there is a gala dinner in the City Hall for 700 international Olympic delegates, hosted by the King and Queen of Sweden. Tomorrow, there is a big event for the public in the main football stadium where the Olympics were held in 1912.

I will be on the first flight out to Geneva tomorrow morning in hopes of making the 1300 start of the annual Geneve-Rolle-Geneve Race with my boss and friend Torbjorn Tornqvist in his D35.

Paul

Paul Cayard inducted into National Sailing Hall of Fame

At the inaugural ceremony this evening in San Diego, Paul Cayard was among 15 sailing greats inducted into the National Sailing Hall of Fame.

Having started sailing at the age of seven, Paul Cayard has become one of the best known American sailors of his time. A seven-time world champion, two-time Olympian, Round the World race winner and a veteran of six America’s Cups, Cayard is also the CEO of Artemis Racing – Challenger of Record for the 34th America’s Cup.

This evening’s ceremony recognized the tremendous contribution made to sailing by individuals such as Joshua Slocum and Olin Stephens, as well as living legends Buddy Melges and Lowell North, to name just a few.

Based in Annapolis, Maryland, the National Sailing Center & Hall of Fame is a non-profit educational institution dedicated to preserving the history of sailing, honoring those who have made outstanding contributions to American sailing while also inspiring and encouraging sailing development.

“To be inducted into any Hall of Fame is more than an honor. It is historical, something that can never be taken away, something for future generations. I feel there are plenty of US sailors more worthy of the Hall than I, so I am humbled and flattered to be included in this illustrious group,” said Paul Cayard. “I have crewed for four of the eight living inductees: Dennis Conner, Gary Jobson, Buddy Melges and Lowell North. No question, I had great mentoring in my younger days from these four and a few others. I thank them for their tutelage.”

Over the past year, Paul’s father Pierre Cayard completely restored the El Toro which he built for his son in 1968, the start of his foray into sailing. This evening, Pierre Cayard presented El Toro #6168 to the NSHOF for display in the museum in Annapolis for generations to come.

“On this very special occasion, I was able to be joined by my parents and my children which meant a lot to me,” said Paul. “It is a fairy tale story. I got into sailing by chance when a second grade class mate took me one day. Sailing became my passion, then my vocation. Life is a journey and I have been blessed with an amazing ride.”

In a few short weeks Cayard and Artemis Racing will return to San Diego for the America’s Cup World Series which begins on 16 November, the first event of this Cup cycle to take place in the US

AC-45 Auckland

A great day for Artemis Racing on the water here in New Zealand. Match racing in 15 knots from the East was on the menu and the team won three out of the four races to ‘win’ the day.

The racing a very demanding physically for the five crew onboard. The average heart rate for wing trimmer Sean Clarkson is 150 with peaks at 180 during the 30 minute heat.

No capsizes or collisions today, but it was very close racing.

There is just one maneuver in the three minute prestart but the lead/push game for the final minute and a half is very similar to what we are used to from monohulls.

Our team of 25 people from Artemis Racing have been working very hard for eight weeks on this AC45. AC45 Project Manager Phil Jameson has done an excellent job in preparing the boat not just for these trials but for the World Series which starts in August in Portugal.

I have been in Auckland for three days with the team and I am very pleased with how the entire team is working together.

Tonight I am heading back to California and onto Valencia Sunday where another 40 people are doing great work on designing and building our AC72 which will launch early next year.

This America’s Cup is a very busy one indeed! No one is lacking something to do.

Paul Cayard

Pierre Cayard-Boat builder

-San Bruno, CA

My dad has recently retrieved my first boat, an El Toro that he built for me in our garage in San Francisco, when I was 8 years old. The link takes you to an article written by Eric Simonsen and some great shots. The plan is for my dad to restore the boat to original and it will be presented to the National Sailing Hall of Fame Museum in Annapolis later this year where it will reside with other U.S. sailing memorabilia.

Very cool for my dad to reconnect with something that he built with his hands and his heart 43 years ago!

http://www.pressure-drop.us/forums/showthread.php?1641-Reclaiming-History-Pierre-Cayard-reunited-with-his-hand-built-El-Toro

Update from Valencia

Valencia,

I am in the middle of a two week stint in Valencia, Spain working mostly with the Artemis Racing technical team which is based here. Juan Kouyoumdjian (Juan K) has his office here with about 20 engineers and since Juan is our lead designer, we built a lot of our structure around Valencia. We are also going to build our wings here and do our first sailing in the new AC72 Class from a sailing base here.

While technology is great these days with email, Skype and Gotomeeting, etc., there is no substitute for being somewhere in person. One of the features of this America’s Cup is what I call “decentralization”. Our technical team is here in Valencia, there will be boatbuilding in Sweden, the sailing team is all over the world…(currently in New Zealand), the America’s Cup itself will take place in San Francisco, thus creating an environment that produces synergy for the team is a big challenge in and of itself. It was all much easier when everyone just moved to one venue for three years as in the “old days” of the Cup. So I travel a lot…what’s new.

Apart from all the scientific part, we are currently working on locating our sailing base. There are a few venues we are investigating and it is interesting trying to imagine what we will and will not be able to do with this boat where you can’t drop the sails to come into the dock. Running down the “cattle shoot” of the America’s Cup harbor here in a nice summer southeasterly sea breeze, at 30 knots because there is no way “ease the main” to slow the thing down, could be a little more exciting than we want. BMW ORACLE was based in the commercial port a year ago when they had there 185 foot winged triamaran. That is not really an option for us but there are other choices.

The Artemis Racing sailing team is in Auckland (another ex AC city) training in our new AC45 catamaran. This new boat will race 8 events over the next year in the America’s Cup World Series. The ACWS is a world tour that will take place every year with the Cup boats. We are starting with these 45 footers as no one has the 72’s ready yet. The 72’s will debut on the World Series in August of 2012 in San Francisco. The idea of the World Series is to feature the America’s Cup boats and sailors on a regular basis. Then once every three years, there will by the America’s Cup itself, thereby preserving the uniqueness of that event.

On a personal note, I have been trying to track down my first sailboat which my father built for me, in the garage of our house in San Francisco, in 1967. I finally found it being well looked after by a couple living just outside of Sacramento, in the Sierra foothills. They were willing to part with the boat and yesterday, my parents drove up there an picked it up. The US National Sailing Hall of Fame wants the boat so my Dad will refinish it, to museum quality and then we will present it to the museum later this year. I am excited for my Dad as it is a nice way to memorialize what a great thing he did for his 8 year old son.

Paul

Paul Cayard – a candid portrait

Paul gives us a candid look at how he got here and where he wants to go. Whether its his early experiences with America’s Cup sailing with Tom Blackaller on Defender and then USA or looking into the future with his new team Artemis Racing, Paul let’s us in on some good stories about what it takes to sail the for the Cup.

Paul also tells us a little about the lessons learned on the EF Language Whitbread campaign as they raced across the Southern Ocean.

AC45-New Zealand

It was a fantastic day today on the Hauraki Gulf in the new AC45 prototype catamaran. Blue sky and 15 knots of wind from the Southwest made for a great training day for Artemis Racing.

Following a strange incident on Monday whereby the hard wing sail was damaged, the Artemis team worked alongside the ACRM team and Core Builders to get the new generation America’s Cup yacht back out on the water.

I was particularly pleased the boat was ready today as this gave me an opportunity to sail the boat before heading to the airport for my flight back to San Francisco tonight.

My impressions are that the boat is nothing less than spectacular. I am not a multihull sailor, but I was able to steer the boat around a couple of laps on the Hauraki Gulf under the watchful eye of Santiago Lange, two time Silver medalist and Artemis Racing team member.

The boat seemed very balanced and the typical multihull peril of leeward bow submersion was non existent. We easily skipped along at 20+ knots downwind and about 12 knots upwind. The crew (and helmsman) hike out just like on a Laser.

Hats off to Oracle Racing and Core Builders for taking this boat from concept to sailing in just 4 months!

Artemis will be sailing the prototype for three more days. Then we begin the assembly of our own boat for a mid-March training session down here in Auckland. The first AC45 World Series event will be in July.

It really struck me today that there is a new era of America’s Cup coming and I was very happy to be part of it!

Paul

U.S. yacht wins final regatta leg

Published: June 18, 2006

GOTEBORG, Sweden The U.S. yacht Pirates of the Caribbean won the ninth and final leg of the Volvo Ocean Race on Saturday, while the Dutch entry ABN AMRO One took overall honors for the grueling around-the-world regatta.

The No. 1 Dutch yacht, skippered by Mike Sanderson, was last in the six- yacht fleet in the ninth leg, but won the 58,000-kilometer, or 36,000-mile, race with a total of 96 points.

“This has been a great run for ABN AMRO,” Sanderson said. “This is a rock-solid team.”

His crew celebrated by throwing Sanderson overboard.

The Pirates finished second over all with 73, while Brasil 1 was third in the leg and third over all.

In Saturday’s race, skipper Paul Cayard’s Pirates edged the second-placed ABN AMRO Two by 4 minutes, 50 seconds. The No. 2 Dutch boat came fourth over all with 58.5 points.

“This couldn’t have been scripted better by anyone in Hollywood,” Cayard, 46, said of the close finish.

For Simon Fisher, the 28-year-old navigator aboard ABN AMRO Two, it was a bittersweet end to the ocean odyssey.

“We were feeling pretty confident until the wind ran out,” he said. “It would have been sweet, actually winning a leg, but we were unlucky.”

The race started off at Vigo, Spain, in November and has been marked by the death of a sailor and the dramatic rescue of the 10-man crew of the sinking entry Movistar of Spain.

The last leg was a 925-kilometer dash from Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, to this southern Swedish port.

Hundreds of small boats crowded the waters off Sweden’s second-largest city, while thousands – including King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia – gathered in bright sunshine to cheer the yachts from shore.

GOTEBORG, Sweden The U.S. yacht Pirates of the Caribbean won the ninth and final leg of the Volvo Ocean Race on Saturday, while the Dutch entry ABN AMRO One took overall honors for the grueling around-the-world regatta.

The No. 1 Dutch yacht, skippered by Mike Sanderson, was last in the six- yacht fleet in the ninth leg, but won the 58,000-kilometer, or 36,000-mile, race with a total of 96 points.

“This has been a great run for ABN AMRO,” Sanderson said. “This is a rock-solid team.”

His crew celebrated by throwing Sanderson overboard.

The Pirates finished second over all with 73, while Brasil 1 was third in the leg and third over all.

In Saturday’s race, skipper Paul Cayard’s Pirates edged the second-placed ABN AMRO Two by 4 minutes, 50 seconds. The No. 2 Dutch boat came fourth over all with 58.5 points.

“This couldn’t have been scripted better by anyone in Hollywood,” Cayard, 46, said of the close finish.

For Simon Fisher, the 28-year-old navigator aboard ABN AMRO Two, it was a bittersweet end to the ocean odyssey.

“We were feeling pretty confident until the wind ran out,” he said. “It would have been sweet, actually winning a leg, but we were unlucky.”

The race started off at Vigo, Spain, in November and has been marked by the death of a sailor and the dramatic rescue of the 10-man crew of the sinking entry Movistar of Spain.

The last leg was a 925-kilometer dash from Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, to this southern Swedish port.

Hundreds of small boats crowded the waters off Sweden’s second-largest city, while thousands – including King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia – gathered in bright sunshine to cheer the yachts from shore.

GOTEBORG, Sweden The U.S. yacht Pirates of the Caribbean won the ninth and final leg of the Volvo Ocean Race on Saturday, while the Dutch entry ABN AMRO One took overall honors for the grueling around-the-world regatta.

The No. 1 Dutch yacht, skippered by Mike Sanderson, was last in the six- yacht fleet in the ninth leg, but won the 58,000-kilometer, or 36,000-mile, race with a total of 96 points.

“This has been a great run for ABN AMRO,” Sanderson said. “This is a rock-solid team.”

His crew celebrated by throwing Sanderson overboard.

The Pirates finished second over all with 73, while Brasil 1 was third in the leg and third over all.

In Saturday’s race, skipper Paul Cayard’s Pirates edged the second-placed ABN AMRO Two by 4 minutes, 50 seconds. The No. 2 Dutch boat came fourth over all with 58.5 points.

“This couldn’t have been scripted better by anyone in Hollywood,” Cayard, 46, said of the close finish.

For Simon Fisher, the 28-year-old navigator aboard ABN AMRO Two, it was a bittersweet end to the ocean odyssey.

“We were feeling pretty confident until the wind ran out,” he said. “It would have been sweet, actually winning a leg, but we were unlucky.”

The race started off at Vigo, Spain, in November and has been marked by the death of a sailor and the dramatic rescue of the 10-man crew of the sinking entry Movistar of Spain.

The last leg was a 925-kilometer dash from Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, to this southern Swedish port.

Hundreds of small boats crowded the waters off Sweden’s second-largest city, while thousands – including King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia – gathered in bright sunshine to cheer the yachts from shore.

GOTEBORG, Sweden The U.S. yacht Pirates of the Caribbean won the ninth and final leg of the Volvo Ocean Race on Saturday, while the Dutch entry ABN AMRO One took overall honors for the grueling around-the-world regatta.

The No. 1 Dutch yacht, skippered by Mike Sanderson, was last in the six- yacht fleet in the ninth leg, but won the 58,000-kilometer, or 36,000-mile, race with a total of 96 points.

“This has been a great run for ABN AMRO,” Sanderson said. “This is a rock-solid team.”

His crew celebrated by throwing Sanderson overboard.

The Pirates finished second over all with 73, while Brasil 1 was third in the leg and third over all.

In Saturday’s race, skipper Paul Cayard’s Pirates edged the second-placed ABN AMRO Two by 4 minutes, 50 seconds. The No. 2 Dutch boat came fourth over all with 58.5 points.

“This couldn’t have been scripted better by anyone in Hollywood,” Cayard, 46, said of the close finish.

For Simon Fisher, the 28-year-old navigator aboard ABN AMRO Two, it was a bittersweet end to the ocean odyssey.

“We were feeling pretty confident until the wind ran out,” he said. “It would have been sweet, actually winning a leg, but we were unlucky.”

The race started off at Vigo, Spain, in November and has been marked by the death of a sailor and the dramatic rescue of the 10-man crew of the sinking entry Movistar of Spain.

The last leg was a 925-kilometer dash from Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, to this southern Swedish port.

Hundreds of small boats crowded the waters off Sweden’s second-largest city, while thousands – including King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia – gathered in bright sunshine to cheer the yachts from shore.

In the Arena: For ocean race’s leader, the only trouble has been in port

MONDAY, MAY 8, 2006

BALTIMORE The awkward moments for the leaders of the Volvo Ocean Race have been reserved for port.

There was the broken arm that the watch captain, Mark Christensen, suffered when he took a tumble as the crew docked the yacht in Cape Town. There were those two straggling performances during the inshore legs in Sanxenxo, Spain, in November and in Annapolis, Maryland, a week ago.

There was even the opening pitch by the captain, Mike Sanderson, at Tuesday night’s baseball game here at Camden Yards – a pitch that bounced before it crossed the plate, much to the amusement of Oriole fans who would not know their port from their starboard.

But put ABN AMRO One to sea with its wide beam and no-nonsense multinational crew, and there is nothing awkward about it. It has been slicing through the swells and crushing the suspense out of the quadrennial round-the- world Volvo race since the first ocean leg in November, and the Dutch boat without a single Dutch sailor now holds what looks suspiciously like an insurmountable lead over the rest of the fleet, with four of the nine offshore legs including the current one, from Annapolis to New York, still to be settled.

The boat that its crew has dubbed Black Betty has had too many edges: an edge in preparation time; an edge in finances; an edge in boat design; even an edge in boat redesign. It has all been very impressive as they have racked up the points and the nautical miles and the publicity for the Dutch bank that is bankrolling them.

Volvo Ocean Procession does not have nearly the same ring to it, but then that is hardly the leaders’ fault. Who’s to chastise a pleasant, competent bunch of sleep-deprived men with calluses on their calluses for getting the most out of themselves and their cleverly conceived yacht?

“Of course, we are surprised about the gap, but we are over the moon with the gap; long may it continue,” said Sanderson, an unpretentious 34-year- old who looks a few years older at this bleary stage.

The gap stood at 19.5 points heading into the current leg, a Sunday-to-Tuesday sprint. ABN AMRO One could finish in last place in the next two legs – or even skip the next two legs altogether – and still be guaranteed the lead, but none of the chase pack is expecting a sudden disappearing act.

“ABN AMRO One is just clearly in a class to itself in terms of the speed,” the veteran skipper Paul Cayard said as his Pirates of the Caribbean sat in third place. “They aren’t even really racing. They’re just riding on the boat that is going about a knot faster. In all the races I’ve done, there hasn’t been such a big speed discrepancy among the fleet.”

The discrepancy has its roots in the decision to hire Juan Kouyoumdjian, a young Argentine boat designer. The Annapolis-based company of Bruce Farr has long dominated the market for yachts in the Volvo race, formerly known as the Whitbread. Farr or his associates have designed every winner since 1985, and this time, the four other primary contenders turned to Farr again: Movistar, Pirates of the Caribbean, Brasil 1 and Ericsson Racing Team.

But ABN never even negotiated with Farr, choosing to work with Kouyoumdjian, a 34-year-old who made his name designing America’s Cup yachts and who is more commonly known in yachting circles – for obvious reasons – as Juan K.

Clearly, Juan K. got his sums and computer simulations right for the debut race of the Volvo 70 class, with its extra length and canting keel. Clearly, it was a masterly decision to build a surprisingly wide double-rudder boat that was optimized for 11 to 18 knots of wind yet very slow in light winds, as witness its sixth-place finish in Annapolis.

Farr’s people spent some of the Maryland stopover picking over the yachts they had designed to get an idea of what they could have done better. Cayard has his theory. He says Farr and his team miscalculated the point when the stability of a wider hull would begin to outweigh the benefits of a narrower hull, which generates less drag.

“Historically, the average wind speed around the world is 13 knots, and Farr must have thought the narrow boat would be the right beam for 13 knots,” Cayard said. “But in fact, because the sail plan powers the boat up more – probably – than they anticipated, the crossover is not 13 knots. It’s really 11 knots.”

What also helped ABN AMRO was having the time and money to run a two-boat program, the only one this year, so Sanderson and his crew could test the first boat out of the yard for several months and provide major input into how to improve the primary boat, which was still under construction.

The recent winners of the Volvo have usually been two-boat programs, but to limit costs, the race organizers adopted a rule this time that any boat built for the race would have to compete in the race. That dissuaded most of the entrants from building two, but ABN AMRO stuck to the traditional winner’s strategy and elected to use its first boat, nicknamed the White Boat, as a learning experience for young, gifted sailors, primarily in their 20s.

The surprise, after nearly five months of racing, is that the youngsters are in fourth place and just three points behind second-place Movistar, the Spanish-based boat that was one of the pre- race favorites. But Movistar, unlike the ABN boats, nearly sank in the early going because of issues with the new keel.

“We’ve had a lot of the breakages the other teams are having,” Sanderson said. “The difference is that we had a lot of those pre-race.”

ABN’s crew members are clearly sensitive to suggestions that they are simply along for the ride, that their